Is welding smoke carcinogenic? International cancer researchers now say a clear ‘yes’!

Welding smoke carcinogenic? International researchers say "yes".

International cancer researchers determined that welding smoke is carcinogenic, in a recently published article. According to the cancer research agency of the World Health Organization, welding smoke has so far only been classified as possibly carcinogenic. With the new classification, the scientists adapted the estimation of the risks posed by welding smoke on the basis of new findings from several studies.

Laser welding: automated, but hazardous for employees nonetheless

Auch beim Laserschweißen entsteht Schweißrauch.

Are there definitely risks from welding fumes, if a robot is doing the welding? Many welders ask this question when laser welding. The almost completely automated welding process mainly hides hazards if it is used with additives. A welding fume … >> more

40 years of KEMPER – the interview: “In former times, welding fumes were regarded as healthy to some extent”

Kampf dem Schweißrauch seit 40 Jahren: KEMPER ist Pionier in der Schweißrauchabsaugung. Gründer Gerd Kemper blickt im Interview mit arbeitsschutz-schweissen.de zurück.

With a gut feeling, courage and of course a set of reliable figures as a basis, in 1977 Gerd Kemper set out on a personal crusade: clean air at the workplace while welding. Something which in the early days appeared alien to his expectations actually turned out to be a vital business field. 40 years after establishing KEMPER GmbH – formed on 17th March 1977 – Gerd Kemper is now looking back on his company and its industry.

Manganese in welding fumes causes symptoms similar to those of Parkinson’s disease

manganese in welding fumes

Welding with additives containing manganese promotes the occurrence of symptoms that are similar to those of Parkinson’s disease. The higher the manganese content in the welding fumes, the more marked are the symptoms that arise. These are the findings of a recent study.

Limit values for welding fumes: Let’s count the particles!

Grenzwerte für Schweißrauch stehen in der Diskussion. Björn Kemper tritt für die Zählung der Feinstaubpartikel ein.

Are today’s limit values for welding fumes still relevant in their current form? Science and the industrial sector have doubts. KEMPER GmbH argues in favour of measuring the number of particles when evaluating welding fumes concentration. The true health hazard for employees is before the limit is reached – an essay by Björn Kemper.

Resistance welding: Risk from magnetic fields with little welding fumes

Widerstandsschweißen Gefahren magnetische Felder Raumlüftungssystem

Welding fumes are not the greatest risk from resistance welding. Magnetic currents created by the welding process pose a far greater threat to the health of employees.  Use of suction and filtering technology is therefore advisable, at least with a … >> more

WIG welding: “Clean” process with underestimated health risk

It is deemed a “clean” welding process creating only little welding fumes and is therefore often underestimated: WIG welding. The process harbors health risks which should not be underestimated. Welders are exposed to nitrogen oxides, radioactivity and ozone in particular. … >> more

Fine dust: the invisible danger

The danger is in the unseen: Fine dust is a threat to people. Specifically, ultra-fine dust particles constitute a health threat. This finding is becoming more accepted in science and practice and can be applied directly to welding or rather … >> more

MIG welding: highly hazardous despite lower quantities of welding fumes

MAG-welding: common, despite high emissions of welding fumes